21/08/2017

Five steps to working in Germany

Looking for a job

Quick-Check

Check out your chances of being able to live and work in Germany with Quick-Check.
Jobseeker’s visa

You might have the possibility of looking for a job here in Germany. Here, we explain which kind of visa you need and where to apply for it.
Check out job vacancies

You can hunt for vacancies on the job exchange on this portal. Further job openings in Germany are listed on the job exchanges of the Federal Employment Agency (BA) and the EURES network, to cite two examples. And of course, you can look for suitable advertisements in daily and weekly newspapers – or simply apply to the company of your choice spontaneously. If you would like some personal advice, you call our “Hotline Working and Living in Germany” under the telephone number +49 30 1815 - 1111. Here you will find more information about searching for job vacancies here.
Applying for a job

Already found an interesting vacancy? In that case, you need to submit a written application. We can show you how to make a good impression.
Getting your qualification recognised

Make sure you know the following things: what is your professional qualification actually called in Germany? Do you need any additional specific qualifications for the post you have found, or do you need to get your foreign qualification recognised? Armed with this knowledge, you’re sure to score points when you submit your application.
The job interview

If your application makes a good impression, the company will invite you for a job interview. Congratulations, you’ve successfully completed your first step towards working in Germany. We can provide some helpful tips as you prepare for your interview.
Signing your work contract

You want the job! The company wants you! All that's left to do now is to sign your work contract. Read the whole text carefully – it tells you about the principal terms and conditions of your new job.

 

Visa application

 Visa?

If you’re a citizen of the EU, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland, it’s simple: just move to Germany – and off you go. You do not need a work permit.
Apply for a visa

If you are a citizen of any other country, the next step is to apply for a visa. You can do this in your home country by applying to a German mission abroad. If you are already in Germany on a visa that authorises you to take up or seek gainful employment, simply go to the foreign nationals' registration authority which is responsible for the place where you live.
Attractive conditions for academics

Germany offers especially attractive conditions for academics wishing to migrate here. For example, you can apply for a jobseeker’s visa. This entitles you to come to Germany for up to six months and look for a job while in the country.

Moving

Your first accomodation

For the first few weeks, it is best to stay in hotels, youth hostels, short-term rented accommodation or take a flat share. That will give you time and leisure to shop around for the right kind of accommodation and take a close look at properties.
Looking for housing

You’ll find offers for accommodation on property Web sites, or in the small ads of local daily newspapers. Perhaps your new colleague will be able to provide some tips about finding somewhere to live. Find out what the price of rental per square metre is in the place where you want to live. To do this, ask the municipal authorities for the rent index, which provides this information. Here are some easy ways of finding the best offers.
Signing a lease

Before moving into rented accommodation, you will need to sign a lease. Among other things, the lease states how much you will be paying for your accommodation every month. Before signing, make sure to check what ancillary costs are included in the rent and what costs might be charged on top.
A successful move-in

Now you're ready to move in. Don’t forget to contact the service providers so that by the time you move in you already have a telephone line, Internet connection, power and water supply and television.

 Settling in

Making friends

You will feel at home much more quickly if you're surrounded by friends and acquaintances. You can make friends through (sports) clubs or at events. There are also plenty of opportunities to get to know people with similar interests over the Internet. Another way is through integration courses. There you’ll get to know people who arrived in Germany only recently – just like you. Quite incidentally, the courses will help you improve your German and teach you more about your new home country.
Discovering Germany

How about a couple of excursions to discover Germany? Take a trip to the Bavarian Alps, or to the North Sea or Baltic coast, for example. Go shopping in Berlin, or take a boat trip around Hamburg harbour. If you wish to drive somewhere by car, check whether your driving licence is valid in Germany. If you prefer to travel by train, look into the numerous special offers.
Opening a bank account

It is advisable to open a current account with a bank very soon after you arrive. All you will need is your passport, residence certificate showing your address and, in some cases, a pay slip from your employer. To send money home, you can either use the SWIFT transfer facility or money transfer companies, or send cheques by registered post.
Staying healthy

We don’t wish this on you, but it could happen that either you or a member of your family falls ill in Germany at some point. Thanks to the statutory health insurance, you’re well insured should that be the case. You will find a doctor in the telephone directory, on the Web pages of the locality where you live or on interactive online maps, for example; or ask your colleagues for advice. In an emergency, dial 112. After a short while, an emergency doctor will arrive.
Seek advice!

Some things might seem strange or unusual to you when you first arrive in Germany. It may be helpful to seek professional and personal advice and support to assist you in dealing with some everyday challenges. The staff at the immigration advice service for adult immigrants will conduct an initial consultation with you to better understand your specific circumstances. If you’d like, they can then discuss further steps with you that can help facilitate your integration. Find your closest immigration advice service here.


Family

A visa for your family

As an EU citizen, you do not need a residence permit when you move to Germany. If you come from another country, a few immigration rules apply to your family. Take your time to read the conditions. You will see that they are not an obstacle to your coming as a foreign worker.
Opportunities for families

Perhaps your spouse would like to work in Germany too? You can find out the conditions required for doing so here.
Your children in good hands

Register your youngest children with a day nursery or kindergarten. There is no obligation to do so, but for your youngest children it’s a great chance to make friends and learn German. There are also plenty of international kindergartens. We explain how to find a good day nursery or suitable kindergarten
Finding the right school

Is your child over six years old? In that case, you need to look for the right school, because in Germany, school is obligatory for children. One sign of a good school is if it offers extra-curricular activities such as music and theatre groups or sports clubs, for example. Moreover, most schools in Germany are state-run – and therefore free of charge. Many of them are “twinned” with schools abroad. There might even be a school which has links with a school in your home country.

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